Coming Out of Hiding – Cap Crusher 12k 2019 Race Recap

It’s a live blog post!

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I am reviving my blog because I love reading other race recaps when I’m preparing for a race, and I couldn’t find many recent posts for the Coast Mountain Trail Series’ Cap Crusher. I think they used to have an 8k course and there are a few blog posts about that, but there’s virtually nothing on the 12k course that I ran this year (2019). There is also a 24k course, which is the 12k distance doubled (you run it one direction the first time out, then in reverse the second time). Hopefully, this post will help people running the course in 2020 and beyond.

This was a triumphant race for me no matter what, because it was my first race post-partum. I ran 5 races while pregnant, but I hadn’t run a race NOT pregnant since November 2017, so it’s been awhile. Here’s the Cole’s notes of my post-pregnancy running routine:

  • I had a c-section so things were slow moving for the first little while. My first run was about 2k at Week 7 or 8 post-partum – I can’t even remember exactly when it was – and it was HARD.
  • There are a lot of physical changes that happens during pregnancy and when you have a baby. I am lucky because I seem to have skipped pelvic floor issues (which can make running tricky, to say the least), but it did feel like my core was a bowl of Jell-o for awhile.
  • I followed the same training plan that I did when I ran last year’s Loop the Lake 21k, but only out to the ~13k week. I started training around the end of January.
  • Training was NOT EASY. The reality is that it is just hard to get out right now. I have to work around Cedric’s work, my work, and the baby’s napping and feeding. Running in the trails takes a long time, so I could only run on trails once or twice a week (I always ran my longest run of the week on the trails), then I would do mostly roads with a few dreadful treadmill runs when the only time I could squeeze a run in was at 9PM. (Note to self: treadmill run after lasagna dinner is a bad idea). I tried to incorporate hills on the road runs whenever possible.
  • In addition to running, I have been doing baby + mom fitness classes once a week at Storm Fitness┬áhere in Squamish, taught by Carrie from Pinnacle Fitness. I’ve been doing this since my baby was about 12 weeks, and I cannot say enough good things about the classes. They focus a lot on building a strong core and it is nice to meet like-minded women in an environment where I don’t have to worry if my baby gets fussy, needs to eat, etc.

Okay, now on to the race itself.

I have volunteered at quite a few Coast Mountain Trail Series races, but I have never actually run in one! From my experience volunteering, I know that they are extremely well-managed and that courses are well-marked. The Cap Crusher was no exception. The website is pro and a glance at the course map told me everything I need to know: the course is loopy, the end is hilly, and there are plenty of ups and downs throughout the course.

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I am extremely unfamiliar with running the North Shore trails. I ran a trail race called “My First Trail Race” in the Lower Seymour area in 2010 (I had to go back in my emails to see where this race was/when it was – it wasn’t just my first trail race, but my first trail run altogether), and then I ran the MEC Trail Series in West Van a couple of years ago. That’s it for North Shore trails for me. I’d never set foot in the Capilano Canyon/Cleveland Dam trails until today.

The trails reminded me a lot of the ones I ran in the MEC trail race. I did not find it terribly technical, at least compared to a lot of the trails in the Squamish area. There were a few finicky areas that required careful footwork (especially as the legs started to tire), but overall they weren’t too bad. I would compare it to maybe Jack’s Trail or Debeck’s Trail here in Squamish (both of which I ran a lot while training for this race, which was helpful).

However, non-technical doesn’t necessarily mean easy!

Let me rewind to the race day details. The trails in Squamish and the North Shore have been super icy and nasty due to the atypical long winter we’ve had out here. When I checked the race weather a week or so out, it looked like it was going to be wet and rainy. An early week pre-race email suggested bringing spikes. Yikes.

However, as the old saying goes, March comes in like a lion and goes out like a lamb. The few days before the race were nice and warm, and the trails ended up being in GREAT shape on race day. A day-before-the-race email let us know we wouldn’t need our spikes after all, and aside from a couple of steps in slightly mucky bits, the trails were awesome. As a bonus, the weather was beautiful too – around 5 degrees at the start and a gorgeous, sunny day.

I did something I almost never do: I left my hydration vest behind. Since I didn’t need to carry spikes and I didn’t need tons of water as it wasn’t a hot day, I figured I could get away with a t-shirt and a light jacket and use the jacket for things like my phone (just in case), an energy ball for fuel, and my collapsible water bottle. There is an aid station at 7.5km, but all CMTS races are cup-free so you have to bring your own drinking vessel.

I was a little on the warm side, but overall I am pleased with my race day getup. I wish I had green running clothes, because a lot of people were gussied up for St. Patrick’s Day!

We got a parking spot right by the start, which was EXCELLENT because I didn’t want to have to walk too far with baby. I picked up my bib, listened to the pre-race talk, and we were off at 8:30 AM on the nose. The first part of the run is on a logging road and slopes downhill. I had seeded myself towards the middle-back of the pack, but I let my legs fly a little on this initial downhill. I know you are supposed to hold back a bit at the start, but I actually find I use less energy letting my legs windmill on non-technical downs then I do if I try to step carefully. So off I went.

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The first part of the race is great; there are lots of wonderful downhills and the ups are runnable. There are a few sections with stairs and with a couple of exceptions, I ran just about the whole thing. About halfway through the race, there is a long, straight non-technical trail that takes you all the way to the aid station at 7.5 KM. In the course map above, this is the part that requires the inset to see in its entirety. The run out is on a slight downhill, but it was hard to enjoy – because the faster 12k runners were already on their way back and so I knew I’d have to run it uphill very shortly!

I usually never stop at aid stations, but I filled up my bottle about halfway here, which only took a couple of seconds. I ate my energy ball as I started the slow and steady slog back up the long, straight trail. It felt a lot more “uphill” on the way back than it had felt “downhill” on the way down – doesn’t it always feel like that!

At this point, it started to feel like I was running the entire course in reverse – though of course, I know this isn’t the case based on the map above. I think the reason it felt like that was because the 24k runners were now on the course, so there were often people running in the opposite direction of me. This actually wasn’t as confusing as it might sound and it was virtually never an issue for passing or anything, since the trails are decently wide. The course was well-marked and there were marshals everywhere, so getting lost was not a problem.

After the post-fuel station slog, the bulk of the remainder of the course was uphill. I mostly power-hiked the ups and ran the flats (and the precious downhill sections – there were still a few of those!). Another girl let me know when we were at the 10k mark – this was a long (non-technical) hill up, and then there was a flat bit followed by lots of stairs going up. There aren’t many (any?) stairs on the Squamish trails since most of them are bike trails, so this was a little new to me. It felt Grouse Grind-y for a little bit there, or like the start of the Chief.

After the stairs, we had a nice downhill section before the last little climb to the finish. You could literally see the finish line, so the motivation to give it one last little push was there. I crossed the finish line in 1:28:05 and felt a little barf-y, but after I walked it off for a bit, I felt fine.

(I used to puke at finish lines ALL THE TIME, which is so so gross. I haven’t had this happen in like 6 years, though).

In the end, I finished 92/162, 42/91 for all the women in the race and 25/39 for women 30-39. I can’t WAIT to be in the 70+ division – hopefully I will always finish in the top 3! All in all, I am very happy with that result. The distance was just right – it felt do-able but still like a challenge. I pushed myself to the barf-feeling zone without barfing – THAT is my racing sweet spot!

Unfortunately, I didn’t get to stick around the finish line, as there was a hungry baby waiting for me. That means I missed out on the post-race sushi and cupcakes, but I DID get the awesome race swag: a beer and an excellent beer glass, both of which Cedric dibsed instantly.

In conclusion, I have never appreciated running – especially trail running – more than I do now that I have a baby. Time on the trail is truly precious and I really savour those moments where I get to have a little time to myself, even if the weather is gross or the trails are icy. It has been the best medicine for me – running has helped me regain my strength and fitness, feel more like my old self, and experience that sense of peace that you only get when you’re among the trees. I am really grateful that Cedric recognizes how important this is to me and does whatever he can to make sure I can get out the door whenever possible for an hour or two.

So what’s next? The Whistler Half Marathon on June 1! I have NEVER DONE THIS HALF! I have run the 10k course once and have been out of town for the run every year since. I am truly so excited – I love road half marathons because they scare me just a little bit but I know if I work hard, I can conquer the distance. Wish me luck!!!!

5 Peaks Alice Lake Race Recap: First Race of 2018 in the Books!

I am pleased to report that the first race of the season was a great success!

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Don’t mind our colourful wardrobe choices…

Cedric and I volunteered as course marshals last year at the 5 Peaks Alice Lake race, and as a thank you, we received a free into any 5 Peaks race. We saved it for this year’s iteration of the race and had a fantastic time on our respective courses (Cedric did the 8.5k sport course, I ran the 13k enduro course).

This was my second race in the 5 Peaks series, but it had been years since I ran my first one (which was up on Blackcomb mountain).

Logistically, the race was very well run. We picked up our race packages the day before at Capra, so we didn’t feel rushed to get to the start line on Saturday morning. Still, we left with plenty of time because parking at Alice Lake can be finicky. The pre-race email was very clear about parking; it advised to give yourself lots of time and noted that those who carpooled would be rewarded with the better parking spots.

Since we were only two in our car, we parked down by the highway and prepared ourselves for a long-ish, uphill walk to the start line. Luckily, we were able to hitch a ride up with another car – in the end, we only ended up walking 10 minutes or so to the start.

As the kid races were underway, I made my way to the queue for the porta potties. It was longish, but moved steadily and I made it in and out with a good 10 minutes to spare before the start of the race.

The enduro runners got a head start over the sport runners. The two courses start out the same for the first 4 or 5 km, so this gives everyone a good chance to space themselves out a bit. To help ease congestion on the trails even more, we seeded ourselves into different groups. Each seed took off a few minutes apart. I hung back, starting with the last group – speed wasn’t my goal for this race.

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I spy Cedric! Photo Credit: Rob Shaer Photo

I should mention now that despite a nasty weather forecast, the weather was PERFECT. It was cloudy and cool for the most part, with the sun peeking through every so often. I saw people in shorts and tanks, and I saw people in down vests. It was that perfect in between weather. Despite a few days of steady rain leading up to the race, I didn’t find the trails to be too muddy at all. I had expected the worst weather-wise, but it ended up being just fine. I love when that happens!

The first part of the race takes you clockwise along the Four Lakes Loop. At this point, everyone was trying to find their place in the pack – there was a lot of passing and leapfrogging, but it wasn’t too bad. Things cleared up quite a bit as we approached the wide, flat stretch (where you hang a right to continue onto Four Lakes, rather than going left onto Bob McIntosh). I no longer felt like I was fighting for a spot as there was plenty of space.

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I like this photo because I’m such a ninny about running on the wooden parts when it’s wet – I always look down. Photo Credit: Rob Shaer Photo

Despite my pre-race porta potty visit, I had to pee again – but I knew there were a couple of outhouses along this stretch of the trail. The first one was occupied, but the second one a little further down was free. There’s a race hack for those who are stuck in a long line as the race is about to start – if you can hang in there for a few km, you can visit the on course toilets!

Shortly after the toilets (and aid station) is when the two courses split off. The enduro runners go for an additional loop along Tazer, Rupert, and some other trails. I happen to think that this loop features some of the most fun trails to run – I would definitely recommend it if you’re torn between the two distances. It starts of with a bit of uphill (still runnable, if you’ve got plenty of steam in your engine), then continues on to some fun, technical stuff with plenty of cool bike features.

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Solid game face from Cedric. Photo Credit: Rob Shaer Photo

The trail opens up at Tracks from Hell, which has a nice wooden bridge/platform section (I always like running these for a change of pace). Eventually, the course merges back and for a short section, you run a part of the course that you already covered a little earlier. It gives a bit of a sense of deja vu.

Shortly after, the course takes you towards Credit Line. I run Credit Line all the time, so I was looking forward to the long stretch of technical downhill. If you’re not used to the trail, this section can be tricky – I saw plenty of people taking their time, and I totally understood why (after all, this is the trail I sprained my ankle on last year!) I was feeling pretty good the whole way down and eventually, I was spat out onto Jack’s Trail.

I feel like Jack’s is an underrated menacing little bugger. It’s “just” a green mountain biking trail and it is pretty even and non-technical, compared to a lot of other trails in the area. But it slopes upward juuuust enough to tucker you out, especially at the end of the race. It also seems to go on forever and everything kind of looks the same.

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Luckily (or not), I run Jack’s often, so I have certain landmarks I like to look out for to break up the monotony. From Credit Line, you pass Mid Life Crisis on your left – they had a couple of marshals here, which was nice for a morale boost. A little while later, you pass 50 Shades on your right – when you hit this point, know that the distance between Mid Life Crisis and 50 Shades is about the same distance as 50 Shades to the finish line. In other words, you’re almost there.

The nice part about the course is that pretty much as soon as you’re done with Jack’s, you’re right at the finish line – no need to run around Alice Lake or anything.

So that’s the course (I wrote it out for any 2019 or beyond runners who want a detailed preview – sometimes I like to look up race reports to get any idea of what I’m in for).

In terms of how I felt, in a word: GREAT! Without getting into too much detail, I have been running a lot for the past couple of months (gearing up for my Loop the Lakes 21k race next month), but I have been pretty conservative with speed. That’s saying a lot, as those who know me know that I’m not much of a speedster to begin with. My goal for the race was to push myself comfortably (oxymoron?), to maintain my energy right to the finish, and to really enjoy myself.

I feel like I succeeded at all three! I love the racing environment, and even though I am generally not very competitive (unless it involves board games), I like the rush and extra push I get from the people around me. I felt strong and steady the entire run, so I feel like I paced myself perfectly. I crossed the finish line feeling great – and then I stuffed my face with sliced oranges from the snack tent. I ended up running it all in 1:45:32 – kind of mid/back of the pack, which is about what I expected.

Cedric is not usually much of a runner, but I’m glad he joined me for this race and I think he did really well. We celebrated our respective finishes with a hearty breakfast at the Crabapple Cafe in Brackendale. The home fries are to die for.

All in all, 5 Peaks Alice Lake was an awesome experience. I’ll be back next year – whether as a volunteer or racer is still TBD.

Believe It or Not… I’m Still Running

I realize I have not posted about running in… oh, about forever.

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(Actually, I have not posted about anything in forever. I feel like so much of my day is spent on the computer for work, that lately, at the end of the day, the last thing I have felt like doing is getting back on the computer.)

That doesn’t mean I’ve stopped running. In fact, I’m running a lot – typically 5 times a week these days, just about all of which is on trails.

I mellowed out my running over the winter-iest winter months, opting mainly for runs in the 5 – 10 k range and more often on the pavement than on the trails, but I picked things up again towards the end of February to start training for the Loop the Lakes 21k.

I ran that race last year and I quite liked it, but my goal at the time was mainly survival. I had never run a trail race of that length, and an ankle sprain in March seriously messed with any intentions I had for training properly.

This time, I’m entering the race with a plan. Goal #1: don’t sprain my ankle (so far so good – touch wood!) Goal #2: follow a training plan.

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I can’t remember how I found this training plan (I think I googled some combination of trail running half marathon intermediate training), but so far I like it. It is a 12-week plan, which is enough to make me feel prepared but not so much that I start to burn out.

It incorporates 5 runs a week, which is a lot for me – 3 to 4 seems to be my happy place. But 5 is doable for 12 weeks, and it has been particularly enjoyable as the weather has crept from winter to spring (and back again to winter, on some occasions). The first few runs were done with crampons on iced-over trails – but now, I’ve already run a few in shorts and my crampons have been stashed away for the season. (Don’t make me eat my words, Mother Nature!)

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Swapped snow for rain

Each week features one workout type of run, which is somewhat new to me. I’ve often tried to incorporate things like hills and speed into my (admittedly informal, to date) training, but this one really maps it out for you with specific hill repeats, track workouts (ha ha, there is no track in Squamish – a quiet road will have to do), and Fartlek sprinty-fast runs. Don’t forget to do a warm up and cool down for these guys – I typically do 15 minutes of easy road running for each.

The regular runs have a mix of distances (building to 12 miles, which is about 19k) and tell you what kind of effort to give: easy, adding strides, negative splits, tempo, race goal pace, etc. I admit that I am only adhering to the effort part somewhat – the truth is that for trail running, my race goal pace and my easy pace aren’t terribly different from one another.

There are also a couple of rest days per week – I use these for hikes, gym days, or days where I’m too busy (and/or tired) to exercise.

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I haven’t followed the daily schedule faithfully, in that I may not do the designated Monday run on a Monday, but I will make sure it gets done sometime in that week. At the start of each week, I make a check list of each type of run I’m meant to do that week. As long as it gets checked off by the end of the week, I’m happy. That way, I can plan my long runs when the weather is best, and I can squeeze in the shorter ones when my days are busier.

While I’ve felt a little sluggish and low energy emerging from winter hibernation, I truly feel my best on these runs on the trails. Sometimes I forget how pleasurable it is to breath in trees and dirt and rocks – although Cedric and other seasonal allergy sufferers might beg to differ!


Before I tackle the Loop the Lakes course, I have one race to conquer first: the 5 Peaks Alice Lake race this coming weekend. Cedric and I volunteered at this race last year, and we received what I consider to be the ultimate volunteer perk: free registration for any 5 Peaks race. I’ll be running the longer course (13.5k), and even though it may be a little soggy, I’m really looking forward to it.

Over Easter weekend, my local trail running store, Capra, held a free orientation run for the 5 Peaks course. This was perfect – my training schedule happened to call for a 13k run and I always like knowing what I’m going to run ahead of a race.

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As a further bonus, my friend was able to join me at the last minute and we both did the course together – her longest trail run ever, and my longest run in about half a year.

As a bonus bonus, Capra had hidden little Easter eggs throughout the course. Even though we stayed towards the back of the very large pack (seriously – attendance was impressive!), I was determined to find an egg of my own. For the first half an hour or so, we were too busy chatting and forgot to look for eggs. Eventually, we remembered, and I was lucky enough to spot this little white one.

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They smartly imposed a limit of one egg per person, so we set out trying to find an egg for Becky. It was nice having something to distract ourselves with when our legs started getting tired – I wish ALL of my runs had prizes hidden throughout. Such great motivation!

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Alas, we never did find a second egg, but we made it in one piece and I’m feeling excited for the race this weekend. For those wondering, my egg was redeemed for a $25 Capra gift card – a most awesome prize. Thanks, Capra, for the fantastic event (and to Altra for the waffles afterwards!)

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I don’t think I will destroy any records on the Loop the Lakes course in May, but I hope to feel strong the whole time and to enjoy the race day (which I really did last year). I think I should be able to beat last year’s race time, but you know what? I can’t remember exactly how long it took me to run it last year, and I haven’t looked it up yet. I kind of just want to run it my best this year and then compare the two afterwards. We’ll see if I can hold out.

Happy running!

The Official 2017 Magee Running Awards

My goal is really to get outside, explore the local trails, stay healthy and injury-free, and gain a little confidence on running trails.

This is a self-quote from a blog post I wrote nearly a year ago, where I laid out my running plans for 2017. I mostly succeeded in my overall goal, though I failed a little on the “stay healthy and injury-free” side of things – but I’m exiting 2017 in one piece with seven races under my belt (or, more accurately, my running vest). I’d call that a win.

To cap off a season of running, races, and physio visits, I thought I’d get a head start on award show season and celebrate some of my greatest (and not so greatest) running moments of the year.

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Best Race Swag

Overall, this was a positive year for race swag. There was good swag (hats!) and less good swag (so many – too many – drawstring bags), but one race’s swag really stands out: 5 Peaks Alice Lake.

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I didn’t even run this race, but as a volunteer, I got to take home a pair of the neon orange running glove/mitten combos that has become a staple of my winter running wardrobe. Two mittened thumbs up for 5 Peaks Alice Lake!

Best Event to Volunteer At

I volunteered at several races this year (even a mountain biking one!), but the Squamish 50 takes the cake. I volunteered at the package pick up for the 50k, and it was unbelievably well organized. There vibe is positively electric and it was fun matching race bibs with IDs from around the country, continent, and indeed, world. A+ experience.

Best Runner’s High Moment

My spirits were never higher than they were as I finished the Comfortably Numb race in June. I’m not sure why I loved this race so much – I wasn’t particularly fast and there was nothing really out of the ordinary, but I loved running point-to-point on unfamiliar trails, and cruising downhill for the second part of the race was just so, so fun.

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I loved this race and I hope to run in again in the future.

Most Humbling Race

The Squamish 50 23k KICKED MY BUTT. The horrible extra hill detour I took from accidentally veering off course certainly didn’t help.

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This was just a tough race for me – the toughest I’ve ever run. I still can’t figure out if it was because I undertrained or was just having an off day (it happens), or if it is due to the tricky terrain and unforgiving uphills towards the end. I finished the race feeling extremely humbled.

Most Satisfying Race

The Squamish Days 8K was a personal favourite. I love this small local race – it’s a straightforward out-and-back road race and I squeaked in under the 40 minute mark.

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For someone who tends to sit comfortably on the slower side of the middle-of-the-pack in trail runs, it’s fun to be able to run a fast race on the roads. I’m proud of this one!

2017 Trail of Distinction Award

After exploring many of the trails around Alice Lake and Garibaldi Highlands, I proclaim Roller Coaster the recipient of my favourite trail award. I don’t know what it is – it winds so perfectly, meandering up and down (but mostly down) through the beautiful woods without too many death traps to trip over. I love it!

2017 Trail of Terror Award

The first few months of 2017 consisted of awful icy patches, but no section terrified me as much as the bridge by the waterfall on Covenant. On one bitterly cold run, we almost wiped out as the slanted wooden slats were transformed into a wipe-out zone of black ice death. Even in perfect conditions, I STILL cross this bridge with great caution and hesitation.

Best Food

Hands down, the tastiest and most random finish line food were the Hot Buns Cinnamon Buns at Comfortably Numb. Hey – maybe they had something to do with my runner’s high?

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Most Satisfying Impulse Race

I initially only had 3 races on my agenda for 2017, but I signed up for another 4 races on relatively short notice. My last race of 2017 was the Boundary Bay Half Marathon. Just shy of two months out, I decided to take a break from trail running to focus on roads for a bit.

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My training wasn’t pretty (see: injuries and more gym time than running time), but the race ended up being a lot of fun and gave me the extra push I needed to end the year on a good note.


As 2017 comes to a close, I’ve started thinking about my running goals for 2018. I haven’t solidified anything yet, but I already know it’s going to be a tricky year. I’ll be away for some of the big races of the year (including Comfortably Numb and the Squamish 50), but my goals include trying a few new races, running a road race in another province, and enjoying many sunny days on the trails enjoying the smell of hot trees (my favourite smell ever).

Happy trails!

Race Review: TRY EVENTS Boundary Bay Half Marathon Recap

Last year, I ran the Boundary Bay Marathon. It was my first marathon, so I spent more time in my own head that really taking in the race.

This year, I ran the half marathon, a distance I’m a little more comfortable with – so I feel like I’ll be able to provide a little more race feedback for those doing research on the race. (Why are there so few race reports of the Boundary Bay marathon?!?!)

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LET’S DO THIS!!!!!

I signed up for the Boundary Bay Half Marathon on somewhat of a whim. After my Squamish 50 23k race in August, I thought I had one more race in me for the year, so I signed up for the Boundary Bay Half because:

  • The early November timing was just right. I needed a goal to work towards to keep me running through the fall.
  • I knew the course and the race itself – I liked the level of organization, the relatively small race size, and the overall vibe of the event.
  • It was pretty cheap – $55 before September 30 (it’s $50 if you sign up before July 31).

Unfortunately, training didn’t go as planned, as I discussed in an earlier post. The three weeks leading up to the half marathon, I spent a lot of time off my feet. I did a lot of stretching and foam rolling, I got a massage, and I focused on cross training at the gym, on the stationary bike, and at hot yoga. Here’s a sneak peek at my DREADFUL training:

  • 3 weeks out: 0 running from Monday to Wednesday; a whopping 3.02 k run on Thursday (5:29 min/km pace), and a 21.25 k run on Saturday that I suffered through (6:19 min/km pace) <– why did I think that run was a good idea? My sore leg got DESTROYED.
  • 2 weeks out: a 3.97 k run on Tuesday (5:29 min/km pace), a 13.44 k run on Thursday (6:13 min/km pace), and a hike/run up the Sea to Summit trail on Saturday (it took me 1:53:50).
  • 1 week out: a 5.06 k run on Monday (5:32 min/km pace) and a 5.02 k run on Wednesday (5:52 min/km pace).

Not ideal. Not ideal.

When I signed up for the race, I hoped to break the 2 hour barrier (which I’ve only done once before) and perhaps even nab a PB (my PB is something around 1:57). After training through aches and pains, I readjusted my focus to simply running healthy, even if it meant taking 2:10 or 2:15 to finish the darned thing. I felt like a lot of weight had been lifted off my shoulders by shifting my goal. So how did it go? I’ll get to that soon.


Race Details

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Spot the cute dog in the jacket

First, let’s talk about the race itself.

Registration is easy peasy – your usual sign up online affair. As I mentioned, the prices are reasonable, especially for the half and full marathon distances. Cedric signed up for the 5k (his first race ever – he is a non-runner), which was $50 – kind of expensive for the short distance. So the Boundary Bay races offer the best value for the longer distances, but it’s nice that they have a 5k and 10k option so that family and friends can take part.

The Boundary Bay website is not the best – a lot of the key information is kind of hidden in the left column. Maybe they’ll redesign the website by the time next year’s race comes around (which is when future racers are most likely to read this post – hey guys!)

Early package pick up is encouraged. If you live in the area, they give you a few options. It’s a roughly 2 hour drive from Squamish to Delta, so we opted for the day-of package pick up, which costs an extra $5 per person. You also have to send them an email ahead of time to request day-of pick up – they don’t email back to confirm, so you just have to assume it’s all good.

Picking up the bib on race day is smooth sailing. I just gave my name and the $5, and they gave me a bib, timing chip, safety pins and zap traps, and a long sleeved red t-shirt (you specify your size at check out).

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Getting stoked at the start line.

The start line has plenty of parking, some decent public bathrooms (go early – the line gets long!), and – best of all – a McDonalds food truck giving away free McCafe beverages. If the idea of downing a coffee before a marathon makes you nervous, don’t worry – the truck is still there at the end of the race.

Fifteen minutes prior to the race, there’s a group warm up. Ronald himself participates. I suppose I should mention that this race benefits the Ronald McDonald Foundation, a very worthy cause that I’m happy to support. I believe they raised $7,000+ this year at the race. Good job, participants!

Since there are four distances in the race (5k, 10k, half marathon, and marathon), there is a staggered start. Marathon folks take off at 8:30, then three minutes later the half-marathon runners head out, then the 10k, then the 3k. This is great for avoiding congestion, but it makes the gun time a little misleading – for instance, by the time the 5kers take off, the clock has been ticking for about 10 minutes.

The course itself is straightforward – you cannot and will not get lost. It starts off on a hard packed gravelly/sandy/dirt pedestrian/bike path. About two km into the course, it dips into a residential neighbourhood – this is the only portion on pavement. They don’t shut the road down, so they ask you to run single file. It is a low traffic road and there are plenty of volunteers along the way, so it’s no big deal. Then, the road returns to the path, which winds along the ocean. The surface is kind of like a good dirt road – a little slower than running on a paved road, but it’s not potholed, nor is it like running on a loose gravel path. There are parts of the path that are more worn down than others, so if you can get into one of these ruts, it’s a little easier to move faster.

The turnarounds for the 5k, 10k, and half marathon are clearly marked and impossible to miss. There are a few aid stations along the way – I believe these only handed out drinks, but I’m not 100% sure since I brought my own food and drink. As I recall, things get a little boring and industrial on the full marathon route, but the when the half distance turns around, you’re still in the pretty park-like setting by the ocean. You run by a golf course and if you keep your eyes up, you may see a few golden eagles.

If you like a varied course with lots of turns and changes of scenery, you probably won’t love this course. If you like a straight course that requires little in the way of paying attention and allows you to space out and get in the zone, you’ll love it. It’s a very flat course, but given that the surface isn’t road/pavement, it may not be the best course for setting a world record. Or maybe you’ll like the surface because it’s a little easier on the body. Who knows.

The course is marked with kilometre markers and orange pylons. Since it is an out-and-back-course, the numbers are repeated on your return. So if you see the 6k marker on your way back, that means you have 6k to go.

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Snazzy medal – AND you can pretend you came first! (Note the McDonald’s hot chocolate by my feet)

The finish line is the same as the start. Upon crossing it, you get a medal to wear proudly (you earned it!) and a volunteer clips your timing chip from your shoe. Results are not instantaneous, and given that the start times are staggered, the big timer showing the gun time is not perfect for predicting your chip time.

Results are posted on the Try Events website within 24 hours – this year, it only took about 5 hours. Results are divided by distance, but not by age group or sex (these details aren’t provided at all). The order is determined by gun time; there is no option to sort by chip time, so your finishing position may be a little off. If I could give one piece of feedback, it would be to provide better results data – but I’m kind of a data nerd.


My Race

Okay, time to talk about my personal race experience. We had to leave Squamish early (around 6 AM), but the race happened to take place on the day Daylight Savings wound up, so it felt more like 7 AM, mercifully. It was clear day, but cold as heck. Most of my warm up consisted of hopping around trying to maintain circulation. I was VERY glad to have worn running gloves.

I didn’t really get a chance to seed myself at the start line – I just joined the queue, somewhat towards the back, then we were off. I weaved my way through to the crowd to try to find a comfortable start in the first kilometre. I settled somewhere in the middle.

I hadn’t quite decided on a strategy for my race. On the one hand, I could try to run slow and steady to ward off my calf pain for as long as possible (it had reared its ugly head anywhere from 3k to 13k into my “training” runs). On the other hand, I could try to run fast early on to make up for the slow-down that the leg drama would inevitably cause. I was feeling pretty strong, so I decided to run at a pace that felt a little challenging but sustainable.

For this race, I had a feeling I would need extra motivation for zoning out and not focusing on any discomfort, so I busted out a secret weapon: music. I hardly ever run with music (NEVER in the trails), but I had good luck running with tunes at the Squamish Loggers Day 8k in August. This turned out to be a wonderful distraction. The two songs that gave me the most turbospeed super powers (think the mushroom in MarioKart) were Sail by AWOLNation and Forgot About Dre.

KM 1 – 7

The first 7 k felt good, but I was freezing cold. My hands and feet were totally numb. There were a lot of distractions throughout this part of the run: other racers, the km markers, the turnoffs for the 5 k and 10 k distances, the road detour, etc.

Around km 7, three things happened:

  1. My extremities thawed. This was both wonderful and awful (have you ever had that hands defrosting feeling where it feels your nails are falling off? Yeah). I stuffed my running gloves in my vest for the rest of the run.
  2. Sail came on my iPod. I passed a large group of runners and felt like a superstar.
  3. The dull pain in my leg reared its head. I was a little annoyed but happy I’d enjoyed 7 kilometres of pain-free running.

Splits:

KM 1: 5:49 — KM 2: 5:38 — KM 3: 5:29 — KM 4: 5:39 — KM 5: 5:39 — KM 6: 5:38 — KM 7: 5:42

KM 8 – 14

Though the ache in my leg was present, it didn’t feel like pain – just discomfort. My left hip flexor also felt a little wonky (this was a new ailment), so I just focused on keeping proper running form (glutes! glutes! glutes!) and listening to my music. I tried to run relatively conservatively for the first few kms in this segment, knowing that I could pick up the pace depending on how was I feeling at the turnaround.

The turnaround snuck up pretty quickly, so I bid adieu to the poor marathoners and started making my way back. I chowed down on a Kewaza ball at the halfway mark to keep my energy levels high for the second half of the race. (I talk about Kewaza balls and other fueling fun facts in this old marathon training post, if you’re interested.)

When I run longer distances, I try to assessment my effort every so often and think: can I sustain this pace for 15 more minutes? (I read this somewhere long ago and for whatever reason, it works for me). This helped keep me pushing, but within reason.

As I got closer to km 14, I felt a little tired, but I knew that I still had plenty in me. When I reached the 2/3rds mark, I was pleased with how much energy I felt I still had.

I slowed down in this segment, which I’m going to go ahead and blame on the minor but nagging leg tightness.

Splits:

KM 8: 5:46 — KM 9: 5:48 — KM 10: 5:47 — KM 11: 5:53 — KM 12: 5:51 — KM 13: 5:59 — KM 14: 6:00

KM 15 – 21.1

I was feeling good and the solid tunes just kept on coming, so I allowed myself to stare off into the distance and go on autopilot. By this point, the runners were fairly well spaced out. I could see the same cast of characters ahead of me (orange jacket guy, blue jacket guy, black top guy, etc.). Every so often, someone ahead would pull over to walk or tie a shoe. A couple of people passed me, but I had a good amount of wind left in me and I was able to pass more than passed me.

This rarely happens, but the km markers seemed to come reasonably quickly as the race went on. I started to wonder if, against all odds, I just might sneak in under the 2 hour mark after all. I didn’t have a watch on me and my phone was tucked away, so I had to go purely based on feel. I knew I’d have to pick it up and challenge myself if I wanted to really go for it, so I tried my best to giv’er.

Before I knew it, I could see the finish line up ahead. Is it just me or does the finish line always seem like a mirage – so close, but so far? Luckily, the CLASSIC Darude hit, Sandstorm, doo-doo-doo-doo-dooed me all the way to the finish line.

Splits

KM 16: 5:44 — KM 17: 5:45 — KM 18: 5:54 — KM 19: 5:46 — KM 20: 5:44 – KM 21: 5:14 (it was Sandstorm)

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My final chip time, according to the results, was 2:02:23. I am STOKED with this! No, I didn’t break the 2 hour mark, but I felt sooooo good the whole time DESPITE the most lackluster training and a nagging injury. You know what that means, right? It means that if I let myself heal properly and bust my butt in the spring, odds are good that I can set a PR at half in 2018. Game on!

I placed 78/249 runners in the half distance, which I’m happy with (though this is a little misleading, because a handful of runners raced faster than I did, but their gun time was slower because they started behind me). I estimate I came 37/119 for women (based on names that sound womanly) – alright!

As for Cedric, despite ZERO training (literally not a single practice run – though there was some cross training at the gym and on his mountain bike), he placed 12 out of 99 runners for the 5k! He says the runners in that group were on the casual side, but still – I’m pretty stoked for him.

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And that’s that for another year of races. I’ll do a full Year in Review a little later, but I’m so happy to have finished on a high note after facing a few good road bumps in my running this year.

On Running and Changing Plans

When I planned out my race calendar earlier this year, the Squamish 50 23k was supposed to be my last one of the year – but when we returned from the Yukon, I felt like I probably had one more race in me.

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(This photo is 2 years old but seemed suitable enough for this post)

I felt a little burned out from trail running (weird, I know), so I decided to sign up for a road race. I wasn’t exactly smart about it; I hadn’t run on roads in awhile, so I decided to lace up my shoes on a lovely early fall day to see if I could manage to run roughly a half marathon distance (even if it took me forever to do).

I could! It wasn’t easy – I ran at a 6:23 km/h pace – but at least I knew I could handle the distance.

I signed up for a half marathon about 7 weeks out, and I thought that if I worked hard at training, I could probably break 2 hours (which I’ve only done once) and could maybe even snag a PB.

The first month of training – and I use that term lightly, because although I had a rough structure, I wasn’t following a proper plan – went swimmingly. I got progressively faster on my long runs and a 5:45 km/h pace (needed for a 2 hour half) seemed challenging, but doable. Also, my long runs continued to fall on days where the weather was just perfect. Life was good.

Except for one thing: I felt a nagging soreness in my lower left leg – kind of behind the shin, by my inner ankle bone – which was annoying, but ignore-able. I ran through the soreness, but it only got worse. Eventually, I wasn’t able to ignore it anymore. Running was starting to seriously hurt.

The foot on the opposite leg also had a weird shooting pain when I stepped on something uneven (like a small pine cone or a pebble), which wasn’t good either.

I got a solid massage and upped my stretching game, but I was hurting hard only three weeks out from the race. I wasn’t able to put in many miles and my long run was excruciating – and I felt much slower than I’d been in recent weeks. As you can probably imagine, this was not exactly motivating.

Fast forward to today: the race is in a week and a half, and I’m not doing a whole lot of running. Instead, I’m doing lots of long, slow stretching. I’m foam rolling and yoga-ing, too. This morning, I went for a short run and didn’t feel any soreness. I contemplated extending my run, but decided it was better to stop while I didn’t feel any pain rather than pushing it too much.

Of course, running healthy is the most important thing – but I can’t help feel discouraged that the crucial couple of weeks before the race have gone to waste. The good news is that I think I’ll be able to tackle 21.1 k on race day – and if not, I can always drop down a distance.

The bad news is that I worry I’ll feel slow and sluggish and awful. I’m coming to realize that my sub-2 hour goal probably isn’t realistic for me for this race; rather, I should aim to have a healthy, pleasant race, even if I’m going at a snail’s pace. The nasty weather we’ve had as of late hasn’t done much to lift my spirits, but luckily, we’re heading into a stretch of sunshine now.

I’m hoping for a mini miracle on race day – one of those perfect weather days where you feel like you can fly. Either way, I’m getting nachos after, so it’ll be a good day no matter what.

Oh – and now I’m getting sick of road running and can’t wait to get back into the trails. Running, you fickle, fickle beast.

Race Report: The Squamish 50 23K Trail Race 2017

The Squamish 50 kicked my butt.

And I only ran the 23k course.

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Before I knew I was about to get my butt kicked.

I have mad respect for those who ran the 50k and 50 mile courses this weekend. I bow down to those who tackled the 50/50 (50 miles on Saturday, 50k on Sunday).

The Squamish 50 23k was my big race of the summer – the Loop the Lakes 21k and Comfortably Numb races earlier this summer were part of the build up to this run, which would be the longest and highest (1000m ascent, 1200m descent).

I think my summer fitness peaked around June. With vacations, camping, hiking, and out-of-town weddings, this summer has been fun but busy. I’ve been trail running consistently, but in a somewhat haphazard manner. Calling it training would be a bit of a stretch.

Boy, did I feel the effects of my non-training in today’s race.

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225 runners and I took off at 8AM from the start line at Quest University. The first couple of kilometers were part of the Legacy trail that I’ve been running semi-regularly this summer – this was the only part of the course that I was familiar with. I seeded myself towards the middle-back, which seemed about right. Most of the runners in my zone did the same run-walk thing I like to do up the switchbacks around this part of the race.

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I felt pretty good by the time I hit the first aid station 4k into the race. I brought my own food and drink, so I didn’t need to stop. I knew there was another uphill section after the aid station, and that was a bit of slog, but nothing I couldn’t handle.

Although I hadn’t run these trails before, they were similar to those I was used to running. The uphills were pretty steep and I walked all of them, but I cruised on the flats and the downhills, enjoying the technical bits when they showed up. When I hit the “11k to go!” sign, I was feeling pretty good – though I was definitely pacing myself. I wasn’t setting any course records here.

The group was pretty well spaced out. I passed some people, but others passed me. It didn’t feel overcrowded and I didn’t feel like I was hot on anyone’s heels (nor was anyone stepping on mine). Things were going fine.

I passed the second and final aid station shortly after the “11k to go!” sign – and this is where things went wrong. I hit a downhill section, which was wonderful. I booked it down the long, glorious hill and ended up at a bridge with a bunch of kayakers. I looked to see if there were signs indicating that I should cross the bridge – but I couldn’t see any signage or flagging tape. Come to think of it, I hadn’t seen any markers in a little bit.

This is the point where the kayakers informed me I’d taken a wrong turn – and that the course continued ALL THE WAY UP THE HILL I’D JUST RUN.

This was, in a word, heartbreaking. I turned around and started power hiking back, and then I saw another girl barrelling down the hill. I informed her that we’d come off course. On our way back up, we came across another 9 runners who had done the same thing. It was brutal heading back on the long, steep hill. I knew we still had a lot of uphill sections and I was so annoyed at having to use my energy on this one. I didn’t understand how it had happened.

When I finally got back up to the top, I understood. The signs clearly pointed us to the left – they’d put two pylons on the right, which was down the hill I’d taken. My brain had seen the pylons and assumed I was meant to run between them. If I’d looked up, I would have seen that the tape and markers continued down the left.

This mistake cost me energy, but the worst part was that it really rattled my mental game. The detour had taken me about 15 minutes, which is pretty significant. I tried to get myself back on track, but I couldn’t help think about all the people who had passed ahead of me during that time. Ughhh.

I had lots of time to think about it, because the next stretch continued uphill. I kind of felt like I wasn’t “racing” anymore, so I occupied myself with trying to find trash on the trail. The Squamish 50 has a cool initiative where if you pick up garbage along the way, you can redeem it for a pair of new running socks at the end. This kept my mind busy for awhile.

Eventually, I felt like I’d found my stride again. There was a long downhill section that went on for awhile and felt pretty fun.

Then came the uphill.

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That final spike doesn’t look that bad on the elevation profile. It’s very deceiving.

There is a horrible, awful, dreadful uphill portion that starts around kilometer 16 and lasts about 2.5k. It basically sucked the soul out of me. I was in a pack of five or six girls, who became my heroes/guardian angels/soul sisters. We slogged through the seemingly endless uphill sections together. Seriously – it felt like it went on FOREVER. And it was very steep. Any energy that remained in my legs was zapped. I for sure said “I’m dying” out loud at some point.

One of the girls said, “Hopefully this will motivate you – we only have 6k to go!”

In fact, it did not motivate me at all. I had NO IDEA how I could possibly squeeze 6k out of my useless lower half.

What goes up must come down and blah blah blah – but while downhills seemed fun earlier on in the race, now they were just awful. I felt two big blisters forming on my big toes, and I did not trust my legs whatsoever. I had to dig really deep here to try to keep my mind sharp and to make sure my legs were listening to what my brain was saying. It wasn’t horribly technical, but as I learned earlier this season, it only takes one misstep to cause a nasty injury.

I hobbled down the trail – and “hobbled” is the perfect word to describe what I was doing. I recognized the voice of someone I knew and chatted with her for a bit. Eventually, we emerged into the road part of the race. A sign indicated we had 3k to go. I thought, “3k – I can do that. I hope.”

I felt borderline delirious for that last little bit. I ran the downhills okay, but the flats now seemed very difficult. I tried to dissociate from my body (or was it my mind?) and made it through the park. When I hit the underpass, there was a slightly uphill bit that broke my running spell. I now began a run-walk routine: run two lampposts, then walk one. Run two pylons, then walk one.

It’s funny – last year I was a course marshal towards the finish line of this very race. I remember seeing people walking and thinking, “You’re almost there! Pick up the pace – you’re almost at the finish line!” Oh, if I knew then what I know now!

I have to admit that the course marshals towards the end did give me a little extra pep to my step (and by that, I mean I’d run three pylons, walk one). As I got close to the park where the finish line is located, the enthusiastic cheerers gave me the boost I needed to make it to the finish line.

I did it!

My time was 3:37:11. To be honest, I don’t really care about the time. I stopped caring when I made that detour. I figured, hey – my time won’t be great, but at least I’ll be able to beat it next year. I placed 163/226, 53/68 in my division (… not so good…), and 99/141 for the ladies. So that puts me around the 25th percentile. Olympics, here I come!

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This result thingy makes it look like I ran 50k in 3:37:11. So going off that, then I TOTALLY CRUSHED IT.

The finish line was awesome – after I recovered, I partook in the BBQ and enjoyed an Alice & Brohm ice cream (I volunteered at package pick up on Friday and each volunteer was given a free ice cream token). I ran into two separate girlfriends – who happened to come 13th and 14th out of the women and finished nearly an hour faster than me. They are amazing (and unfortunately in my age group – ha ha).

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Lunch of champions.

This race was definitely type 2 fun. I very much hated the second half of it. But I’m already excited to run it again next year. However, it made me realize that there is NO WAY I’m remotely ready to run a 50k race. Especially not this one.

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See you next year, you fickle and wonderful beast of race.

Race Report: MEC Lower Mainland Trail Race Three, 15K

The MEC Lower Mainland Trail Race (the third in its series) was a somewhat impulsive addition to my spring and summer racing schedule. When I heard about it, three things made me want to sign up:

  • At 15k, it was just the right distance for an achievable challenge (there’s also a 55k course) a week ahead of the Comfortably Numb race (which appears to be somewhere between 23 and 25k).
  • I thought it would be fun to run in West Vancouver, for a change of pace.
  • It only cost $15 to run.

Sunday morning, I made the easy drive down to Ambleside Park, picked up my bib, and ran my little heart out.

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The perfect place to shake off pre-race jitters.

I was not familiar with the course at all. I’ve never run any trails in West Vancouver. I’d looked at the map on the website, and it appeared to be an out and back with a little loop about halfway through the course. The elevation didn’t seem too crazy, though all those ups and downs supposedly summed to a total of 693m up and 695m down (my RunKeeper app pegged it at 412m up, but I don’t know if I trust it entirely.) As you can see, it looks like the first half of the race goes up-ish, while the second half goes down-ish.

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Based on this information, I came up with a strategy of starting slow and mellow in the first half, then exploding back through the downhills of the second half.

I seeded myself towards the mid-back of the group at the start line, which meant I couldn’t really hear the announcements that were made. I caught that we were to follow the yellow flags, then I crossed my fingers and hoped that the trail would be well marked. Thankfully, it was, and they had course marshals pointing the way at key zones – though most of the course was pretty straight, so it would’ve been hard to get lost.

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Views from the Start Line

We were off.

I quickly threw my strategy out the window, because I didn’t really know how to execute it. Instead, I just aimed to run it like one of my regular runs: walk the longer or steeper uphills, run the flat bits, and book it on the downhills. It turns out that my strategy didn’t really come into play until a few km into the run, because the first part of the course was very flat – a mix between roads, paved trails, and gravelly stuff. There was a small section in some pretty mellow trails, then we were spit out onto a non-technical trail that reminded me a bit of Jack’s: long, straight, and just slightly uphill (enough to make it not that enjoyable).

Meanwhile, I couldn’t ignore the fact that I was starting to get hungry. Breakfast from 3 hours ago wasn’t cutting it, so I decided to eat my beloved Kewaza ball pretty early in the race (maybe 4-5k in). No regrets there.

I eventually got into the heart of the trails, which I found to be very non-technical – no roots, rocks, or Squamish-y elements – and nicely rolling. There were a few short ups that I walked, but mostly it was very runnable and actually quite fun, with lots of bridges. It wasn’t until about halfway into the race that things started to get hilly – but when they did, they went VERY hilly. I can’t remember exactly how it went – I think it was long hill up, loop, run down that hill, up another REALLY LONG HILL, then back down again. Because the trails weren’t too technical, they were very easy (and fun) to run down. A few people passed me on the ups, but I gained on a few on the downs.

I also gained a bit of time at the aid station. It seemed like most people stopped there, but I BYOed fuel. This was kind of nice because I was now running around different people. One of the things about races that I can’t really “train” for in my runs is the mental aspect of racing against other people. It’s really hard not to compare yourself to others – to try to match Person A’s pace, or pass Person B, or not let Person C’s heavy breathing behind you get to you. The comparisons didn’t stop, but it was nice for Persons A, B, and C to have different faces.

The run back was nice because I knew what to expect, since it was the same as the run out. As always, I felt challenged by the balance of running fast without burning out too soon. Has anyone mastered this? Can you tell me the secret?

We got back to the road/paved/mellow part of the course around KM 12. I was really putting a lot of effort into running – I didn’t feel like I was spent or anything – but other people had more gas in the tank, and people started passing me. By now, we were pretty spaced out, but I would still guess that 8-12 people passed me between KMs 12-14 (some were in pairs). It’s so hard not to get discouraged by this.

Then, with about 1k left in the race, I got pooed on by a bird! I can only remember this happening once before in my life. Luckily (?), it got my bare arm, so I just had to kind of scrape it along the grass – but the gross feeling lingered. They say that getting bird pooed is lucky, and I actually didn’t get passed at all between the poo incident and the finish line.

Speaking of the finish line, it was a horrible tease – I could see the MEC arch in the distance but it looked like a mirage. It didn’t seem to get any closer. And yet, eventually, it came. I ran through the finish line, straight to the bathroom to soap up my arm.

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The start/finish zone

The night before the race, I decided to check out last year’s finish times to try to set a time goal for myself. Last year, the fastest woman finished in a most impressive 1:12:20. The slowest few were 2:44, and the median was 1:45:46. Most women seemed to finish between 1:30 and 2:00, so I set a goal to finish sometime in there – I definitely wanted to duck in before the 2:00 point.

So How Did I Do?

My final time was 1:47:41 – exactly where I hoped to finish! That put me 51/109 for the women in this year’s race, and 13/31 for my age group. I’m actually very happy about this – for me to be on the slightly faster side of average is great! I’m in awe of the first place woman who ran the course in 1:13:39 (I can’t run 15k on the ROAD that fast!).

Here are my splits, for those who care (a.k.a. me when I run this again next year):

  1. 6:04
  2. 6:11
  3. 6:35
  4. 6:35
  5. 7:47
  6. 7:58
  7. 7:39
  8. 10:23 (this is where the massive uphill was)
  9. 6:19 (and this is where we got to run down it)
  10. 7:36
  11. 8:11
  12. 5:48
  13. 6:46
  14. 6:24
  15. 6:17 (bird poo power)
  16. 5.52 for the last little bit.

Volunteering at Survival of the Fittest (i.e., An Excuse to Write a Running Post)

Baking bread is not the only thing I do in my spare time – but you wouldn’t know that by looking at my blog. To balance things out a little, I figure I’m due to write another post about running.

Upcoming Races

I got a little caught up in recovering from my sprained ankle and diving into a short but sweet training session for the Loop the Lakes 21k – and I kind of forgot I have another race that just so happens to be in TWO SHORT WEEKS! How did that happen?! I haven’t done a lot of longer runs lately, so I’ll try to squeeze a few in the coming week so I’m not totally in over my head for the Comfortably Numb Trail Race on June 10.

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Views from a lookout on a recent run with the Timber and Tor running groups at Capra

I’m also planning on running a smaller (I think – I don’t know much about it) 15k trail run in West Vancouver next weekend. I haven’t registered for it yet and I haven’t look too much into it, but it sounds like a fun thing to do… so why not, right?

Volunteering

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Views from bib pick up – what what!

The good news is that I’m doing plenty of race day mentality training by volunteering at the local races. This weekend, I volunteered at Survival of the Fittest (part of the Coast Mountain Trail Series), which took place right here in Squamish. I had some pretty glamorous volunteer roles: bib pick up and timing.

I’m not being sarcastic – these roles are way cooler than marshaling. First of all, there’s lots of action. I was right at the start/finish, which was pretty exciting. It dawned on me that I’d never actually been around the finish line when the winners run through it – I’m always rolling in waaaaaay later. It turns out, there are no fireworks – it’s actually a little bit quiet for the first few finishers just because there aren’t as many people hanging around yet. The buzz really starts when a few dozen people have already crossed the finish line.

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A mediocre photo of the not mediocre view at the end of the race

Next weekend, I’ll be volunteering at the Be Fearless race around Alice Lake/Quest University (it’s a long one – 11k, 21k, or 42k). I’ll be doing my thing as course marshal. I think I need to find a cowbell.

Current Plans

Current plans: keep on running. Don’t die at Comfortably Numb. Keep all toenails.

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(I’ve never actually lost a toenail. I think it’s because I trim my nails a lot and wear shoes that fit properly.)

The Lakes Have Been Looped: Race Recap of Run Squamish’s Loop the Lakes 21k

Woohoo! I did it!

When I signed up for the Loop the Lakes 21k back in November, I had no idea what I was in for. A long, snowy winter; an ankle sprain leading to a 6 week running hiatus; a 5 week period to get on my feet and train for my first trail half marathon. But everything came together and I had such a wonderful race day.

In the week leading up to the race, the forecast called for a rainy day, which wasn’t ideal but hey – a little rain has never stopped me before. Miraculously, race day ended up being my dream running weather: cool, but warm enough to wear shorts and a t-shirt, and party cloudy.

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We rolled into Alice Lake around 7:30, and there was heaps of parking (always a mild concern at Alice Lake). The race started at 8, so I got my bib and my sweet swag (a Run Squamish hat that I am currently wearing) and sat in the sun doing my pre-run ankle warm up moves. Super cool. You needed photo ID to pick up your bib, which I didn’t know – luckily, they accepted my Facebook profile as ID. The future is now!

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Just before 8, I joined the small mass of people at the starting line and saw my running buddy, Olivia. Olivia and I have run a couple of times together at the Capra group runs and agreed to run this race together. It was her first trail race – she only started running six months ago, which amazes me. In the past few weeks, I have been so concerned that I would slow her down, but in the end we were a perfect pair.

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The race started and everyone took off – FAST! The Loop the Lakes race has 3 distances: 21k, 15k, and 8k. It dawned on me that most of the serious/fast long distance trail runners in this race would probably opt for the longest distance, which meant that we were up against some speedy folks. Luckily, neither of us really cared about where we placed, so we started off towards the back of the pack and let everyone else run ahead.

I can’t really give a play-by-play of what happened, because we chatted the whole entire time and so I wasn’t focusing much on the race itself. It was wonderful. I thought I was going to walk every single uphill on the course, but I actually found myself tackling some of the easier ones because I was so lost in conversation. The first loop of the Four Lakes trail went swimmingly, and before I knew it we were an Mike’s Loop and then on to Entrails.

Things were really going in fast motion from here. Entrails felt way quicker than it did when I ran it on my own, as did Roller Coaster and Lumberjack. From there, we took a detour to Jack’s that involved going up some rocky steep zones. This was a slight energy zap, but we quickly got onto Jack’s.

Jack’s went amazingly quickly. I was really confused because the trail was looking like it does towards the end, near Alice Lake Park, but I thought there was no way we were already that far. I even asked Olivia if she was sure we were on Jack’s. I didn’t notice my usual landmarks (like seeing Credit Line and 50 Shades along the way). I honestly couldn’t believe it when we were spat out at Alice Lake. We only had one more loop to go and we’d be done.

The last loop was a little tougher – it was weird because we were now running against the grain for those doing the 8k, like salmon swimming upstream. Olivia’s legs were starting to feel it, so I blabbered on with stories to keep us distracted. We finally crossed over from the Stump Lake side over to the Alice Lake side, and for a brief moment, I thought we still had a lap around Alice Lake to complete – but I was just confused (again) and the finish line was actually right in front of us.

I had NO idea how long this race would take me. My road half marathon times have ranged from about 1:56 – 2:10 (minus the Fail Race), but that definitely doesn’t translate into trail running times. Earlier in the week, I ran 18k in 2:45, so I though the very fastest I could do 21k was 3 hours, probably closer to 3 and a half if the weather was iffy or if I was feeling off.

I was stoked to cross the finish line at 2:54:40. While this didn’t earn me any awards (I came 32/37 women for the 21k distance… but hey, only the fastest ladies were running this distance, right?!), it DID earn me a massive plate of nachos from the Shady Tree.

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Can we talk about these ‘chos for a second? The only time I’ve had them before was after my marathon. I remembered them being amazing, but I wasn’t sure if that was just because I was so exhausted from the marathon. I can now confirm that they really ARE amazing. In my opinion, NOWHERE in Whistler makes good nachos. The Shady Tree has it dialed in: the ingredients are real/delicious; they’re layering skills are impeccable; and they have a tortilla at the bottom to catch all excess toppings. I call this the nacho triple threat. Squamish clearly has Whistler beat in the nacho department.

I finished this race feeling pretty strong – my legs felt (and still feel) really good, we ran at a super mellow pace (very much conversational), my spirits were high the entire time, and I did not have a single ankle problem. I’m very excited to run my other races now – I think I can step it up and challenge myself a little more by faster and maybe working on hills, now that I know I can handle the distance. As long as I continue to feel healthy (touch wood), I think this will be a very fun summer of running.

I ended up signing up for a shorter (10k) trail run around Lost Lake in Whistler next weekend, so that might be a fun distance to try to speed things up a bit. For now, I’ll wear my Run Squamish hat and bask in the post race glory. Ahhh.